Allure and Abjection: The Possible Potential of Severed Qualities

Frenchy Lunning, ‘Allure and Abjection: The Possible Potential of Severed Qualities’, pp.83-105, in: Behar, K. (Ed.), 2016. Object-oriented feminism. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.

p.83

This is a tale of two gestures that meet in the heat of a metaphoric confrontation of transformation. In comparing Graham Harman’s work on allure juxtaposed with Julia Kristeva’s work on abjection, certain relationships, similarities, and movements suggest a way to read across each of their central metaphors in structure and movement, and in their implications of marginal identities and aesthetic locations.

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All Objects Are Deviant

Timothy Morton, ‘All Objects Are Deviant: Feminism and Ecological Intimacy’, pp.65-79, in: Behar, K. (Ed.), 2016. Object-oriented feminism. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.

p.65

Object-oriented ontology (OOO) subverts the metaphysics of presence by arguing that all beings withdraw, that is, they are incapable of being (fully) accessed by another entity: my idea of this glass is not the glass, the parts of the glass are not the glass, and so on.

Withdrawal rather underscores the unspeakable suchness of a thing. Withdrawal is a paradoxical term, since it might be better to imagine what it consists in as an intimacy or proximity that makes a thing impossible to access because it is too close.

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Playing String Figures with Companion Species

Haraway, Donna J. “Playing String Figures with Companion Species” in:

Haraway, D.J., 2016. Staying with the trouble: making kin in the Chthulucene. Duke University Press, Durham.

https://monoskop.org/media/text/haraway_2016_staying_with_the_trouble

String figures are like stories; they propose and enact patterns for participants to inhabit, somehow, on a vulnerable and wounded earth. My multispecies storytelling is about recuperation in complex histories that are as full of dying as living, as full of endings, even genocides, as beginnings.

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In a Minor Key

Erin Manning, ‘In a Minor Key’, pp.1-25, in:
Manning, E., 2016. The Minor Gesture: thought in the act. Duke University Press, Durham.
p.1

The minor gesture, allied to Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of the minor, is the gestural force that opens experience to its potential variation.

A minor key is always interlaced with major keys—the minor works the major from within.

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Like a Thought

‘Introduction: Like a Thought’, p.xiii-xxxix, in:
Massumi, Brian. (Ed.), 2002. A shock to thought: expression after Deleuze and Guattari. Routledge, London ; New York.
p.xiii
Expression conjures up the image of a self-governing, reflective individual whose inner life can be conveyed at will to a public composed of similarly sovereign individuals – rational atoms of human experience in voluntary segregation, usefully sharing thoughts and experiences. In a word: ‘communication’.
Communicational models of expression share many assumptions.
All of these assumptions have been severely tested by structuralist, poststructuralist, postmodern, postpostmodern thought. Communication has long since fallen on hard times and with it, expression.

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The Implications of the New Materialisms for Feminist Epistemology

Frost, S., 2011. The Implications of the New Materialisms for Feminist Epistemology, in: Grasswick, H.E. (Ed.), Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. Springer Netherlands, Dordrecht, pp. 69–83.
p.69

For feminist philosophers and theorists, the body as a living organism is a vexed object, so vexed, in fact, that in philosophical and theoretical work, it is often sidelined, bracketed, or ignored.

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Metaphor and Materiality

Judy Wajcman, ‘Metaphor and Materiality’, pp.102-130, in:
Wajcman, J., 2004. TechnoFeminism. Polity, Cambridge ; Malden, MA.

p.102

Technology is an intimate presence in our lives and increasingly defines who we are and how we live. Just as the typewriter and the automobile were icons of freedom for women in the discourse of modernity that presaged first-wave feminism, so cyberspace and cyborgs have become ubiquitous postmodern symbols for feminism today.

Women’s lives have changed irrevocably during the twentieth century, rendering traditional sex roles increasingly untenable.

Testo Junkie

Beatriz Preciado, Testo Junkie: Sex, Drugs, and Biopolitics – Journal #44 April 2013 – e-flux [WWW Document], n.d. URL http://www.e-flux.com/journal/44/60141/testo-junkie-sex-drugs-and-biopolitics/ (accessed 1.2.17).

The changes within neoliberalism that we are witnessing are characterized not only by the transformation of “gender,” “sex,” “sexuality,” “sexual identity,” and “pleasure” into objects of the political management of living, but also by the fact that this management itself is carried out through the new dynamics of advanced techno-capitalism, global media, and biotechnologies.

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Virtual Gender

Judy Wajcman, ‘Virtual Gender’, pp.56-77, in:
Wajcman, J., 2004. TechnoFeminism. Polity, Cambridge ; Malden, MA.
p.57
Progress is still defined by technological enterprises, but it is digital rather than space technology that now excites the imagination with its more immediate and accessible possibilities. Rarely having made it into outer space, little wonder that feminists have seized upon new digital technologies for their potential to finally free women from the constraints of their sex.
p.59
The conviction that the Internet is the solution to social disintegration and individualism is no less popular than the idea that it will accelerate these trends.

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A Call to Arms

‘A Call to Arms’, pp.173-204, in:

Ahmed, Sara., 2014. Willful subjects. Duke University Press, Durham.

p.174

[…] Gramsci (1975) is calling for us to be willing something actively and with intelligence or though, asking us to orientate ourselves toward the future we hope to bring about, to work with others toward an actualisation of a possibility, of concrete initiatives.

Wilfulness tends to imply a articular kind of subject, one that has intentions and knows her intentions.

p.175

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