The Camera That Ate Itself

Matthew Fuller, ‘The Camera That Ate Itself’, 55-85 in:

Fuller, M., 2007. Media ecologies: materialist energies in art and technoculture, 1st MIT Press paperback edition. ed, Leonardo. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England.

p.55

This persistent whimsy that labor-saving technology will of itself release people into a helter-skelter world of self-determined fun is less a theory than a suburban myth.

Nevertheless, Flusser’s Towards a Philosophy of Photography insists we play along. Having been liberated from the necessity, if not from the compulsion, to work, people are available for play.

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I would rather be a cyborg than a goddess

Jasbir Puar, ‘‘I would rather be a cyborg than a goddess’: Intersectionality, Assemblage, and Affective Politics’, 2001. [http://eipcp.net/transversal/0811/puar/en]

Intersectionality and assemblage are not analogous in terms of content, intent, nor utility, but they have at times been produced as somehow incompatible or even oppositional. While, as analytics, they may not be reconcilable they need not be oppositional, but rather frictional.

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Object Oriented Feminisms

Katherine Behar, ‘An Introduction to OOF’, pp.1–36 in:

Behar, K. (Ed.), 2016. Object-oriented feminism. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.
p.2

In what can only be characterized as ontological slut shaming, bunnies—which is to say, sexualized female bodies—are barred from ontology. And if, reading this, we think OOO must be joking by committing to this founding gesture (in print, at that), it is assuredly not. Now this ontology looks not only tiny but impoverished.

A Thousand Reps

Amy Ireland and Linda Dement, ‘A Thousand Reps’, 2016

http://runway.org.au/a-thousand-reps

The unacknowledged status of reproductive labour has traditionally been connected to socialist-feminist responses to capitalism, identified as a site from which protest against the system as a whole can be activated, without necessarily questioning the logic of reproductive labour itself—as a form that reinforces a single, heteronormative mode of creativity.

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Playing String Figures with Companion Species

Haraway, Donna J. “Playing String Figures with Companion Species” in:

Haraway, D.J., 2016. Staying with the trouble: making kin in the Chthulucene. Duke University Press, Durham.

https://monoskop.org/media/text/haraway_2016_staying_with_the_trouble

String figures are like stories; they propose and enact patterns for participants to inhabit, somehow, on a vulnerable and wounded earth. My multispecies storytelling is about recuperation in complex histories that are as full of dying as living, as full of endings, even genocides, as beginnings.

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Staying with the Trouble

Haraway, Donna J. “Introduction” in:

Haraway, D.J., 2016. Staying with the trouble: making kin in the Chthulucene. Duke University Press, Durham.

https://monoskop.org/media/text/haraway_2016_staying_with_the_trouble

Trouble is an interesting word. It derives from a thirteenth-century French verb meaning “to stir up,” “to make cloudy,” “to disturb.”

Mixed-up times are overflowing with both pain and joy—with vastly unjust patterns of pain and joy, with unnecessary killing of ongoingness but also with necessary resurgence. The task is to make kin in lines of inventive connection as a practice of learning to live and die well with each other in a thick present.

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In a Minor Key

Erin Manning, ‘In a Minor Key’, pp.1-25, in:
Manning, E., 2016. The Minor Gesture: thought in the act. Duke University Press, Durham.
p.1

The minor gesture, allied to Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of the minor, is the gestural force that opens experience to its potential variation.

A minor key is always interlaced with major keys—the minor works the major from within.

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Retentional Economy

Bernard Steigler, ‘Retentional Economy’, pp.8-13, in:
Stiegler, B., Ross, D., 2010. For a new critique of political economy. Polity, Cambridge.
p.8

In 2001 I argued […] for a new critique: for a critique addressing the question of tertiary retention, that is, the question of mnemotechnics – and in more general terms addressing the question of technics which, qua materialization of experience, always constitutes a spatialization of the time of consciousness beyond consciousness and. therefore, constitutes an unconsciousness, if not the unconscious.

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Future Texts

Alondra Nelson. ‘Future Texts’, pp.1-15 in:

Nelson, A. (ed.), 2002. Afrofuturism. Duke University Press, Durham.

p.1

Forecasts of a utopian (to some) race-free future and pronouncements of the dystopian digital divide are the predominant discourses of blackness and technology in the public sphere.

What matters is less a choice between these two narratives, which fall into conventional libertarian and conservative frameworks, and more what they have in common: namely, the assumption that race is a liability in the twenty-first century—is either negligible or evidence of negligence.

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Like a Thought

‘Introduction: Like a Thought’, p.xiii-xxxix, in:
Massumi, Brian. (Ed.), 2002. A shock to thought: expression after Deleuze and Guattari. Routledge, London ; New York.
p.xiii
Expression conjures up the image of a self-governing, reflective individual whose inner life can be conveyed at will to a public composed of similarly sovereign individuals – rational atoms of human experience in voluntary segregation, usefully sharing thoughts and experiences. In a word: ‘communication’.
Communicational models of expression share many assumptions.
All of these assumptions have been severely tested by structuralist, poststructuralist, postmodern, postpostmodern thought. Communication has long since fallen on hard times and with it, expression.

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